Minnesota Makes the Sale of Synthetic Drugs a Felony

Synthetic drug use is on the rise in Minnesota as evidenced by the spike in calls to poison control centers because of the use of substances like bath salts. The problem with many of these substances, which are designed to mimic the effects of illegal controlled substances such as marijuana, cocaine and methamphetamine, is that they are unregulated and untested, except by those who use them, often with disastrous consequences.

To combat this latest public health problem, Minnesota just passed a new state law that makes the sale of synthetic drugs in Minnesota a felony. Prior to this, sale of synthetic drugs had been classified as a gross misdemeanor. Now, individuals convicted of selling synthetic drugs could face up to five years in prison.

New Law to Keep in Step With Changing Drug Composition.

Another significant change is the way in which synthetic drugs are classified. A major hurdle for law enforcement battling synthetic drug use had been a near constant evolution of chemical composition in the manufacture of the drugs. As soon as law enforcement would ban a drug, individuals making the drugs would alter their composition, making the new drug legal.

To address this problem, the new Minnesota law speeds up the state Pharmacy Board's ability to classify drugs - which will allow the state to keep up with drug makers as they alter the chemical composition of these substances - effectively closing the loophole of continually modified formulations.

Drug Laws in Minnesota

Although both felonies and misdemeanors have serious consequences, people who are charged with a felony face stiffer sentences and fines. In addition, people convicted of felonies risk losing some of their most prized liberties, including the right to vote, own a gun or even pursue certain careers.

Minnesota aggressively prosecutes drug crimes. Those who are charged with felony drug crimes in Minnesota - including offenses like possession of marijuana, cocaine, heroin or methamphetamine - face up to 30 years in prison and fines of up to $1,000,000, depending on the quantity of drugs that were seized and how many previous offenses the defendant has been charged with.

Getting Needed Help

Many individuals who charged with drug crimes are struggling with addiction issues. Prison does little to help individuals who are battling addiction. Alternative sentencing often gives individuals the help they need to get back on track.

Being charged with a drug offense is serious business and should not be taken lightly. The best way to protect your rights is to contact a tough lawyer with extensive experience handling drug crime cases.